10 Minute Meditation Practice For "Bad" Meditators

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The other day I was meditating with the Journey Live Meditation App with one of the founding teachers, Lodro Rinzler, who spoke about creating a medley of meditation. I freakin’ loved his reasoning behind it and wanted to share it with all of you today and give you a few ways for you to incorporate this into your daily practice.

First, the reason why I really resonated with this technique is that it makes it super accessible for anyone to try. If you’ve never meditated before or find that your mind is constantly off in space during a longer meditation, it’s the perfect place to start because you’re focusing on full awareness for a much shorter time.

Often when we are meditating for a long period of time, our minds can wander in a hundred different directions - even if “long” is just a ten-minute sit. With this practice - or combination of practices, really - you’re giving your mind about 60-90 seconds to focus intently on one thing. 

Try this at home and let me know what you think, then join me over on Journey Live Meditation the app every Monday-Friday at 12pm PST for a live 15-minute daily meditation practice.

1 - Set a Timer

Use a timer on your phone or if you have a meditation app that has a bell option (where it’s unguided but you can choose the amount of time you want to sit for) then set the time for 10 minutes. If you’re using your phone, find a custom alarm that’s a little less harsh than the standard iPhone alarm (it’s quite shocking to the nervous system if you hear a fire alarm after ten minutes of zen, no?)

2 - Settle in focusing on the breath

I always ground myself with three cleansing breaths. Use that as your time to fully arrive in your meditation and then allow your breath to settle back into its natural rhythm. As it does, you can focus on elongating your inhales and exhales and scan the body relaxing into any areas that are holding tension with every breath out. 

Take 90-120 seconds (2 minutes) to focus on your inhale and exhale. Count each breath or silently in your head say: “This is my inhale, this is my exhale” to keep the mind focused. You should count up to about 15 total cycles of slow breaths.

3 - Scan your senses

Let go of your awareness of the breath, then start to slowly shift your attention from each of your five senses. Start with touch, then sound, sight (eyes closed or open), smell, and end with taste. Spend about a minute on each one or intuitively move on when you are ready to experience the next sense fully.

This should take about 5 minutes, give or take, and once you’ve gone through all five of your senses, you can bring your awareness back to the breath and slowly add in sense by sense until you’re focusing on your breath and all 5 of your senses at once. 

4 - End with manifestation

My favorite part of my meditation is ending with manifestation. This was inspired by Emily Fletcher of Ziva Meditation. While this isn’t the Ziva technique, Emily highlights how meditation and manifestation are a perfect pair that puts you in a space where you can achieve clarity and guidance around what it is that you are attracting into your life.

After you finish focusing on your senses, let go of any awareness of your physical body and turn your focus to the space behind the eyes. Ask yourself silently what you want your day to look like or what you want to call in and then allow for your mind to create a scene in front of you. 

This might be an actual visualization or it might just be a few thoughts about things you’d like to do for the day or what next step you can take in your career. There isn’t a right or wrong way to manifest, so see what works best for you. In my experience, I will sometimes see something flash before my eyes quickly then be gone. Once I’ve seen it, I call in all the emotions of feeling it into my body so I feel as if I have it right in that moment. 

You’ll allow your creative brain and imagination to run wild for the remaining minutes of your meditation (it’ll likely be the last two minutes) and then end when you hear your alarm or meditation bell ring.

5 - Come out of your meditation slowly. 

Once the bell or alarm goes off, start first by taking three cleansing breaths in, just as you did at the beginning of the sit. This allows you to slowly integrate back into the space you are in rather than shocking your nervous system by quickly opening your eyes and going on your phone.

I take a few moments with eyes closed to stretch out then when I feel ready, I open my eyes and continue my day.

I hope this article was helpful for you guys. I really want to create as much tangible value as possible by sharing the techniques and lifestyle habits that make the biggest difference in my life. Let me know if there are any other topics you’re interested in learning more about and how this meditation works for you!

Resources:

Don’t forget to join me over on Journey Live - you can download the app here!